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FSMA Small Biz Compliance Guide Published by FDA

The Food and Drug Administration recently released a guide to help small businesses comply with the Produce Safety Rule mandated by the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

The FDA said its guide could help farmers determine whether they were eligible for a qualified exemption, which would modify the requirements they are subject to under the Produce Safety Rule.

The main compliance dates for small businesses and very small businesses under the Produce Safety Rule are Jan. 28, 2019, and Jan. 27, 2020, respectively, but certain agricultural water requirements have extended compliance dates.

Label Reviews Are Critical For Food Importers

I previously posted a similar article discussing the importance of label reviews for domestic produced products here. But a recent event reminded me to reiterate the importance of accurate labeling, especially for food importers. Noncompliant labels can cost you time, money and even your relationship with customers.

A few weeks ago, JFC International Inc. issued a voluntary recall for rice seasoning products shipped to the United States. Apparently, the recall was initiated after the company discovered the product was not labeled in English, which is required under U.S. law. Also, because the label was not in English, it is deemed to have failed to disclose allergens contained in the ingredients. Important to point out is that this isn’t JFC International Inc.’s first time being involved with a recall event; they issued a similar recall in 2016 for failing to label in English and undeclared allergens.

This event is an important illustration of how important it is to review your labels prior to shipping your products to the United States. First, one of the most common misbranding mistakes for imports is failure to label in English. This seems like a simple fix, but you would be surprised how often this occurs. Importers should require the shipper to forward a copy of the label prior to shipping to confirm compliance with U.S. law. Now this won’t stop mistakes by workers at the warehouse who load the EU labeled products onto a pallet instead of the U.S. bound product, but if you include language in your contract that makes the shipper responsible for all costs to correct the misbranding in the event the wrong product labels are attached, they will quickly change their quality control practices. This is especially true for shippers who have had to foot the bill after a container is stopped by U.S. Customs.

Second, does a voluntary recall trigger coverage under your product recall insurance policy? Generally, coverage isn’t triggered unless there is an “actual” contamination, which is usually proved by product testing or other evidence. For JCF International, if the recall was initiated for misbranding due to failure to label their products in English, the coverage would be denied. However, because the product contained “actual” allergens, then coverage would probably be triggered. But if the product didn’t contain allergens, then coverage would be denied. Even if the product didn’t contain allergens the company would still need to recall the product because it is still considered misbranded and in violation of the FDC Act, but the recall would potentially result is significant non-reimbursable expenses.

Most food label misbranding violations can be prevented through quality control measures. Importers should, if they have not already, institute best practices to minimize the risk of a potential violation that result in having to respond to FDA Notice of Action letter. These practices should also address who bears the cost and burden to deal with a misbranding violation. Prior planning can help ensure your business identifies and minimizes potential risks commonly associated with the food import industry.

Deadline to List Calories on Restaurant Menus Quickly Approaching

As of May 5, 2017, chain restaurants with 20 or more locations are required to provide nutrition labeling of “standard” menu items. Restaurant owners should, if they haven’t already, start preparing for the compliance deadline. In addition to restaurants, this requirement also applies to food facilities in entertainment venues, such as movie theaters and amusement parks, take-out food establishments, bakeries, convenience stores, grocery stores and supermarkets.

These menu labeling requirements were published on December 1, 2014 as a final rule by the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”), as required under the Affordable Care Act. If you are a small business owner these new rules will have a significant impact on your operations. What it means is that calorie counts will have to be displayed for popcorn at a theater, food from a salad bar, hot dogs from a convenience store and takeout pizza. In addition, vending-machine operators with at least 20 locations also will be required to post calorie counts.

Calorie information also will be required for some alcoholic beverages served in bars and restaurants. This would apply to beverages listed on menus and menu boards, however, this would not apply to mixed drinks ordered at the bar. Craft brewers should take notice. Even if the rules may not directly affect beer manufacturers, those that sell their brews to chain retailers may be forced to supply calorie counts or take their products elsewhere.

While the purpose behind these rules are to combat obesity in America, where over one-third of meals are consumed outside the home, the effect is to burden retailers with significant compliance costs. Retailers are now faced with the choice of passing this additional cost onto the consumer or eliminating certain products from their menus. While not an easy decision for businesses to make, non-compliance can lead to legal action by the FDA.

The rule’s requirements for determining caloric content and labeling menus are highly detailed and complicated. Therefore, if your small business needs assistance in complying with the rule, please contact us at Morsel Law.

RESTAURANT LEASING: PART 4 OF 5

Your Hours May Be Set By Your Landlord:

The Continuous Operation Clause in Restaurant Leases

Most landlords will insist on including a continuous operation clause in a restaurant lease. These clauses require a tenant to be open for business continuously during the term of the lease on specific days and at hours dictated by the landlord. It is in the landlord’s best interest to make sure it’s tenants are fully operating because this attracts customers. More customers increase a tenant’s sales, which in the case of a lease with percentage rent, means more rent owed to the landlord. While these clauses vary considerably from one lease to another, it is important to read and understand them before you enter into a long-term agreement as continuous operation clauses have several hidden problems that could affect the unsophisticated restaurant tenant.

When negotiating a restaurant lease it is crucial to address the days and hours of operation up front. If a landlord isn’t flexible on these items, it’s better for a tenant to know right away so the tenant doesn’t waste their time and money on a site that won’t work for their business model. A clause that requires a tenant to open earlier, or remain open later, then times customers are predicted to patron the restaurant will quickly erode its profitability. For example, a brewpub restaurant concept probably shouldn’t be expected to serve breakfast, but it probably would want to remain open late to maximize alcohol sales. Likewise, a coffee shop serving breakfast and lunch probably won’t want to be required to remain open until 10:00 p.m. Also important for tenants operating in shopping centers that desire to remain open past normal center hours, the lease should address the party responsible to cover increased operating costs, such as additional lighting, security, parking and access.

Another important issue to address in continuous operation clause is the ability of the tenant to close an unprofitable restaurant and/or terminate the lease. Under a typical continuous operation clause, a tenant would be in default under the lease if it ceased operating, opening itself up to damages and penalties. A tenant in this situation would be forced to decide between closing the restaurant to reduce its costs and expenses or default on the lease. However, a tenant can protect themselves from this situation by insisting on including a “go dark” clause.

A “go dark” clause permits a tenant to stop operating at a site without being in default under the lease. This clause is typically dependent on tenant complying with all of its other lease obligations, including paying rent. A “go dark” option may be available immediately or after a period of time operating (e.g., 1, 2 or 3 years). A tenant will still be obligated to pay rent under the lease, but its expenses will be reduced because it is no longer operating. Landlords may require a tenant to provide a reasonable amount of notice of its intent to go dark so that it can find a suitable replacement for the tenant. Since such a notice requirement will extend a tenant’s ability to stop the bleeding, the tenant should insist on minimal amount of notice as possible.

In the event a tenant goes dark during the term of the lease, a landlord is left with an empty space that isn’t generating sales or attracting foot traffic. In order to protect its interests, the landlord may insist on a recapture right. This recapture right permits a landlord to regain control of the space after a tenant goes dark for a period of time and re-lease the space to another tenant of its choice. When the landlord elects to recapture the space the lease terminates. Tenants should include carve out language in the recapture clause for periods of time tenant closes due to a casualty, repairs, maintenance, alterations or periodic reimaging. A landlord may attempt to include language in the recapture clause that requires the tenant to reimburse landlord for certain costs, such as improvements and brokerage fees. A tenant may argue that since the landlord has the ultimate decision to terminate the lease, but for landlord recapturing the space, it would have paid rent for the entire term.

Continuous operation clauses have many moving parts and are complicated.  While this article touches upon some of the issues that commonly arise in a lease negotiation, how these and other issues are resolved will depend upon many factors, including the relative bargaining strength of the parties involved.

Worldwide Olive Oil Shortage

Buyers beware: this could mean an increase in food fraud as criminals attempt to cash in on record high prices. Olive Oil accounts for more than 10% of all incidents of food fraud worldwide. Fraudsters in the past have been caught passing off cheaper oils from Turkey and Tunisia as higher priced Italian oil. Other schemes have been identified where importers were blending cheaper oils, such as hazelnut, soy, corn, walnut or palm oil, and passing the products off as 100% pure olive oil. This is especially concerning when nut-oils are substituted which can lead to major problems for those with food allergies.

For more, see the article here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/02/16/were-about-to-suffer-a-worldwide-olive-oil-shortage-2/?utm_term=.c347b5c940cf